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robsulkowtgw

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Reply with quote  #1 
Do you teach string changing early on in the class or not at all? If a student breaks a string, do you ask them to change it or wait until after class and change it yourself?
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ScubaGirl

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Reply with quote  #2 
This is so very relevant to me right now, because I just finished my guitar re-stringing workshops with my 2 grade 9 classes.  

Basically, I do the re-stringing workshop the second lesson after classes start back in january.  The students start guitar in grade 9, but I feel they need context to make the re-stringing concepts make sense, so I don't want to do it first semester.  It's also a great re-starter for the new year and requires them to practice; not just because they're supposed to practice, but if they don't, the strings wont settle into their tuning as quickly.  Since the guitars are usually new in August (students are required to purchase/provide their own guitars), when we start, they don't really need to change them before that.  So, first semester I would change it for them, though expect them to watch and I explain what I'm doing so they learn something.

They love using the tools and the change of pace in class when doing it, and they really are fascinated with how their guitars react during and after the re-stringing.  It's huge for authentic learning.  Also in first semester we learn about how a guitar is made so they really make a lot of connections here.
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scorch

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Reply with quote  #3 
This is my first year teaching beginning guitar (high school), and I still haven't gone over it. I have a couple of my "rock star" advanced students (who are really more like unofficial T.A.'s) that I've trained on how to change strings. I'll do it or they'll do it, but not the beginners. My plan is to take an entire day to teach string changing a few weeks before the spring concert. That way they'll be in great shape for the concert, and will essentially be new to start out the new year in the fall. I'll hobble along in the fall, changing the D strings whenever they fail, and restring all of them again each spring. Does this sound like a good plan? Or should I completely restring the guitars more often than once a year?
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robsulkowtgw

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Reply with quote  #4 
Great idea! Every student should have an understanding of how the instrument works and how to restring it. It's kind of like teaching your kids to do laundry. When they get to college they won't just look at the machine, scratch their heads, and decide that wearing the same clothes for another week sounds good.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScubaGirl
This is so very relevant to me right now, because I just finished my guitar re-stringing workshops with my 2 grade 9 classes.  

Basically, I do the re-stringing workshop the second lesson after classes start back in january.  The students start guitar in grade 9, but I feel they need context to make the re-stringing concepts make sense, so I don't want to do it first semester.  It's also a great re-starter for the new year and requires them to practice; not just because they're supposed to practice, but if they don't, the strings wont settle into their tuning as quickly.  Since the guitars are usually new in August (students are required to purchase/provide their own guitars), when we start, they don't really need to change them before that.  So, first semester I would change it for them, though expect them to watch and I explain what I'm doing so they learn something.

They love using the tools and the change of pace in class when doing it, and they really are fascinated with how their guitars react during and after the re-stringing.  It's huge for authentic learning.  Also in first semester we learn about how a guitar is made so they really make a lot of connections here.

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robsulkowtgw

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Reply with quote  #5 
Ideally, you would want to change all of the strings every month or so. Realistically, in a classroom setting, you might not have that luxury. 

Here are a couple of options:
1. Pizza/string changing party!
2. Have your class watch the videos here: http://www.guitaredunet.org/string-changing-demystified/
They will learn how to change dreadnoughts, classical, and electric guitars. There is even a video on how guitar strings are made!

Also check out this one on changing bass strings - http://www.guitaredunet.org/change-bass-guitar-strings/ and this video about a Day in the Life of a String - 



Quote:
Originally Posted by scorch
This is my first year teaching beginning guitar (high school), and I still haven't gone over it. I have a couple of my "rock star" advanced students (who are really more like unofficial T.A.'s) that I've trained on how to change strings. I'll do it or they'll do it, but not the beginners. My plan is to take an entire day to teach string changing a few weeks before the spring concert. That way they'll be in great shape for the concert, and will essentially be new to start out the new year in the fall. I'll hobble along in the fall, changing the D strings whenever they fail, and restring all of them again each spring. Does this sound like a good plan? Or should I completely restring the guitars more often than once a year?

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red6uitar

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Reply with quote  #6 
I do not teach changing strings in my class. Intro to guitar to middle schoolers for one quarter 30 minute class. No need - no time.

if the string breaks at the bridge I change it on the fly during class reusing the same string. If I have to replace a string it is after class.
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Glen McCarthy

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Reply with quote  #7 
Never change strings right before a performance. You need to give strings at least a few days of playing to settle in. On Nylon-string (classic guitars), strings 1-3 take longer to set without going flat.
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